Blog Posts Tagged ‘diy’

Threadfollower Kangaroo Kit

We recently got in 6 new Threadfollower kits, each featuring it’s own animal design. Today we are going to help you through this precious Kangaroo kit. It is simple, fun and can be completed in an afternoon.

The kit included: beige felt (2 small, 2 large squares), beige embroidery thread, embroidery needle, stuffing, directions, and pattern

You will need: scissors and pins

To start, the directions will help you prepare your thread. This is done very simply by splitting the thread into two 3-ply pieces. Next, pin the pattern to the appropriately sized felt pieces and cut along the edges.

After cutting all your pieces (2 big body, 2 little body, 2 big ears, 2 little ears, 1 tail, 1 pouch, & 1 base), thread your needle and begin by sewing the two large body pieces together, using a whip stitch.

Once you’ve made it almost to the end, place the tail in-between the two body pieces and continue sewing. Refer back to the pattern for placement guidance.

Once the tail is attached, finish stitching the body. After knotting the thread begin stuffing the kangaroo. I cut a smaller piece to push into the head and stuffed the remaining. Don’t forget to leave some out for the baby’s stuffing.

 

Once stuffed, attach the base using a whip stitch. Attach the pouch to the front of the belly, leaving the top open.  Make sure to allow room for the baby to fit in the pouch. I found it easiest to position the pouch by pinning down the sides.

 

Next, add the ears by pinching the pieces together and sewing one on either side. The little baby body is a quick sew. Whip stitch all the way around leaving a small hole to stuff. Once stuffed close off the opening and attach the little ears.

 

 

Lastly, sew the baby’s nose using the brown thread and the mother’s eyes using the black thread. TA-DAH! The sweetest little kangaroo pair. Perfect for any pocket, lunch box, backpack, or windowsill.

 

 

 

 

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Welcome to Part 2 of our Anya Knit Tutorial series: The Infinity Scarf! We’ve been sewing up cozy infinity scarves for the shop using our new Anya organic cotton knits, and they’ve been really popular. They’re the perfect weight to add a bit of warmth and a stylish print to any outfit. Here’s Mindy with the simple instructions!

Hi All!

Infinity scarves are a fun and easy project, and make a great gift or addition to your wardrobe. We love these scarves in our Anya Organic Knits as a spring accessory! You can play around with the dimensions to make your scarf wider or narrower, shorter or longer. Our Anya Knits are 58” wide, so you’ll have enough fabric to make two scarves!

 

You will need:

  • 1 ½ yds of knit fabric A

  • 1 ½ yds of knit fabric B

  • sewing machine/serger and coordinating thread

  • hand sewing needle

  • pins

  • scissors/rotary cutter

 

Step by step guide:

-Cut a rectangle measuring 14” x 54” (with the long side on the length grain) out of both fabric A and fabric B*.

Anya Organic Infinity Scarf

-Place right sides together and sew along the long edges with a ½” seam allowance, using a zig zag stitch or serger.

 

-Holding the scarf upright and vertical with wrong side out, reach inside the tube and pull the lower short edge up through the tube so that the right sides are facing and the raw edges are even. Pin right sides together, matching fabric A to fabric A and fabric B to fabric B.

Anya Organic Infinity Scarf

-Sew around the tube with a ½” seam allowance, leaving about a 4” gap.

Anya Organic Infinity Scarf

-Turn the scarf right side out through the 4″ gap. Press, and hand stitch the opening closed.

anya organic knit infinity scarf

Let us know if you make an infinity scarf and how it turned out!

–Mindy

*Note: If you prefer to use only one fabric you can cut one larger rectangle, measuring 27” x 54”, then fold lengthwise right sides together and sew the long edge.

 

Monaluna Shop Outside

It’s been a couple weeks since we officially opened, and I’ve finally had a chance to catch my breath – and share some photos! It feels like this has been SUCH a long time coming, but when I really take stock of how much we’ve done over the past 6 months or so, I can see where the time has gone. It’s been so worth it, though! I am loving being in this space, having more room, being able to display all the fabrics and quilts, and really see the prints working together. I’m also enjoying being able to meet some of my customers and be a part of the community here. And it’s been pretty amazing to see the space come together and really take shape. Our customers seem to love it, too! Here’s a little summary of 6 months of work:

Before and After

As you can see, it’s a big change! And each step of the way we *got* to learn a new skill…

carpet un-laying

…Carpet un-laying…

demolition

…demolition (you should see the slo-mo video we got!)…

Monacan shop ceiling in progress

…ceiling painting (I really loved that mini-scaffolding – thanks for the loan, Jim!)…

Tile restoration

…tile restoration…

Building the Cutting Table

…furniture building…

painting!

… and all about paint guns!

Once the hard labor was done, we got to really have fun with the details and make it a space that feels good to us. So many aspects of the shop have stories behind them, and it’s been a lot of fun to seek out special pieces and put together the displays.

shelves 2

We used the boards from our old fence to panel our room divider and the bathroom wall. A friend of ours, who happened to live in our house 20 years before we bought it, stopped into the shop right after we opened, and we laughed when we realized that he had actually been the one who built the fence 30 years ago.

bathroom

fabric shelves

Our new friend Warren custom-built the fabric shelves, because I was having a lot of trouble finding shelves that would accommodate 3 tiers of fabric.

reclaimed shelves b

The long shelves in the front of the shop were made from a Modesto Ash tree that had to be cut down near our local library. They’re beautiful and strong, and I love seeing them in the shop every day.

monaluna jewelry display

Our jewelry display was bought from a nice woman we met on craigslist, and the display boxes were from an old hardware store. We painted them white on the inside to show off the jewelry.

monaluna organic fabric bundles

Our electrician, Paul, brought us 3 wooden spools from a job site, and once we painted them up they’ve become our favorite shop displays!

shop inside

Monaluna shop front

And then we’ve found lots of beautiful wooden and metal details that bring the warmth of well-used natural materials.

juicy organic fat quarters

We’re loving the space. If you’re in the area, stop by and see us!

BEFORE AND AFTER OUTSIDE

 

Before I moved to the bay area, I wasn’t really aware of orange seasons. Oranges were always available at the grocery store when I wanted them, and I didn’t think too much more about it. Now that I have an orange tree in my yard (along with two tangerines, a teeny grapefruit, two lemons and several little limes) I think about the season a lot. I watch with anticipation as the blossoms give way to little green nubs, which eventually grow and turn orange. I sample numerous super sour and not-quite-ripe oranges to see if they’re ready, and finally, after what seems like an eternity, they turn sweet. Our oranges have been in season for about 6 weeks now, and I’ve made a little ritual of going out and picking them off the tree for dessert. There’s nothing quite like a cold, sweet orange picked fresh by moonlight.

 

Anyway, as is the case with all of the ridiculously productive little fruit trees in our yard, our orange tree has given us way more fruit than we, our neighbors, and all of the teachers at Anabelle’s school can eat. I’ve put them in salads, I’ve squeezed them for juice, and I’ve made 2 batches of some of the best marmalade I’ve had in recent memory. We’re going to harvest the rest of the tree this weekend and do a run to the local food bank, but I think I’m going to have to make one more batch of marmalade, just to get me through til next year. Since even if you live in snow-laden MN (sorry, I heard about the storm this week, and don’t mean to rub it in…) you can always find oranges at the grocery store, I though I’d share the recipe here.

 

Sweet Citrus Marmalade

8 small-medium oranges

3-4 tangerines if desired

3 lemons

11 cups sugar

2 packages sure jell pectin

1/8 tsp baking soda

3 cups water or orange juice

3-4 Tbsp. whiskey (optional)

12 1/2 pint jam jars

Jar tongs and funnel, optional

 

1. Make sure jars are clean and sterile. An easy way to do this is to wash jars and lids in your dishwasher. Wash the fruit.

2. Using a paring knife or a vegetable peeler, remove the outer rind (orange part only) from the fruit. Chop the rinds into chunks or strips and set aside

3. Remove the remaining white rind from the fruit and discard. Chop the fruit into chunks, removing any seeds or tough parts. Put fruit and any liquid into a bowl.

4. Measure out the sugar and put into a bowl. Take 1/4 cup of the sugar, mix this together with the pectin powder, and combine this mixture with the chopped fruit.

5. Place the chopped peels in a large saucepan with 2 cups water or juice and 1/8 tsp. baking soda. Bring to a boil, turn down and simmer for 20 minutes. If you want a marmalade that is less bitter, you can use less of the peel, or omit it completely.

6. Meanwhile, fill a large, high-sided pot 1/2 way with water and place on the stove to boil. This will be used to process the jars once filled.

7. Once the peels have softened, add the chopped fruit and the additional cup of water or juice and simmer for 10 minutes.

8. Add the sugar, stir, and bring the mixture to a full boil. Boil hard for 1 minute

9. Remove marmalade from heat and add the whiskey, if desired.

10. Carefully fill the jars within 1/4″ of top, wipe off any drips and secure lids. I use a jam funnel and a ladle for this step.

10. Once all the jars are filled, you will want to process them in boiling water for 20 minutes. To do this, place as many jars as will fit in the pot described in step 6. The jars should be covered by 1″ of water. Return water to boil and boil jars for 20 minutes, in batches if necessary. Jar tongs are really helpful for this step.

11. You’re done! Once the jars cool, they can be stored for about a year. It may take up to 2 weeks for marmalade to set completely.