Blog Posts Tagged ‘monaluna’

Threadfollower Kangaroo Kit

We recently got in 6 new Threadfollower kits, each featuring it’s own animal design. Today we are going to help you through this precious Kangaroo kit. It is simple, fun and can be completed in an afternoon.

The kit included: beige felt (2 small, 2 large squares), beige embroidery thread, embroidery needle, stuffing, directions, and pattern

You will need: scissors and pins

To start, the directions will help you prepare your thread. This is done very simply by splitting the thread into two 3-ply pieces. Next, pin the pattern to the appropriately sized felt pieces and cut along the edges.

After cutting all your pieces (2 big body, 2 little body, 2 big ears, 2 little ears, 1 tail, 1 pouch, & 1 base), thread your needle and begin by sewing the two large body pieces together, using a whip stitch.

Once you’ve made it almost to the end, place the tail in-between the two body pieces and continue sewing. Refer back to the pattern for placement guidance.

Once the tail is attached, finish stitching the body. After knotting the thread begin stuffing the kangaroo. I cut a smaller piece to push into the head and stuffed the remaining. Don’t forget to leave some out for the baby’s stuffing.

 

Once stuffed, attach the base using a whip stitch. Attach the pouch to the front of the belly, leaving the top open.  Make sure to allow room for the baby to fit in the pouch. I found it easiest to position the pouch by pinning down the sides.

 

Next, add the ears by pinching the pieces together and sewing one on either side. The little baby body is a quick sew. Whip stitch all the way around leaving a small hole to stuff. Once stuffed close off the opening and attach the little ears.

 

 

Lastly, sew the baby’s nose using the brown thread and the mother’s eyes using the black thread. TA-DAH! The sweetest little kangaroo pair. Perfect for any pocket, lunch box, backpack, or windowsill.

 

 

 

 

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August is coming to a close and, at least in our area, all the kids are back in school. Are summers shorter than they used to be, or does time just fly that much faster when you’re an adult? I still have stacks of summer sewing projects that I wanted to do, but it’s time to move on to fall. We’ve stitched up some darling drawstring backpacks, perfect for light loads for school, sleepover kits or a hands-free carryall for grown-ups.

Sew Can She  is always coming up with great patterns and tutorials, and we spotted this one, available for free for download. It’s also easy to modify to suit your needs. We decided to make ours a bit bigger and use grommets instead of fabric tabs for the securing of the straps. The pattern includes fabric straps, but you can just as easily use rope-like cording, like we did, ribbon, or any other strap-link material.

There is also an option to add a ruffle accent at the top to add a bit of flare. The ruffle is added by cutting the fabric at 6″ instead of 3″ at the top. Then sewing a stitch an inch away from the seam allowing the trim to attach to the main fabric.

Adding grommets are much easier than you may think. You can purchase a grommet kit at most craft stores or online. They come with easy to follow instructions and the only additional tool you will need is a hammer. We really enjoyed how the grommets and cord finished these backpacks. They are also super adjustable for all sizes and fits.

This backpacks were made using Cottage Garden Organic Poplin and Simple Life Organic Poplin, but you could easily use canvas for a studier finish. Overall, these backpacks only need about an yard and a quarter of fabric and take no time at all to sew up. Don’t forget to tag @monalunadesign and hashtag #monaluna on Instagram so we can see how you put yours together. Happy Sewing!

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This week at Monaluna, we stitched up the free Sorbetto pattern by Colette in our  Cherry Blossom Dusk  organic cotton lawn  from Haiku 2. The pattern is easily printed out and feature sizes 1-26.

We chose Version 1, which features a center front box pleat and bust darts for shaping. Bias tape finishes the modest scoop neckline as well as the armholes. Here in California the weather is just perfect for this classic, lightweight top. The simple pattern, with the added pleating creates a romantic piece suitable for all occasions. We are in love with how this piece turned out!

 

Our organic cotton lawn is an ideal fabric for this pattern, because it is lightweight and drapey, but still crisp enough to hold a nice pleat. The poplins will work well, too, and can transition better into cooler weather.

With this pattern there are unlimited possibilities! Here are some suggestions for which of our organic fabrics we think will also work well with this pattern.

 

Version 2 of the Sorbetto top features a center front box pleat and bust darts for shaping. Bias tape finishes the modest scoop neckline as well as the armholes. This tunic length version has a side seam vent and slight high-low hem, which is finished with a facing.

For Version 2 we think Scattered Petals, Spots lawn, and Cherry Blossom Dawn would make a beautiful garment!

Version 3 of the Sorbetto top features a center front box pleat and bust darts for shaping. Bias tape finishes the modest scoop neckline. This version includes short set-in sleeves that are finished with a baby hem.

For Version 2 we were thinking Brush Teal, Poem Sage, or Clover. Happy Sewing!

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Simple Life Organic Canvas by Monaluna

 

I’ve been hearing from customers lately who love the look and feel of our organic cotton canvas, but they’re not quite sure what projects to use it for. We have ideas for you! If the word “canvas” brings to mind heavy, stiff fabric used mainly for tents and oil paintings, we’d love to introduce you to a whole new world of canvas.

 

Ours is a lightweight but sturdy oxford-weave cotton, with just enough structure to make it ideal for tote bags and purses, hats, pillows, table linens, and apparel like skirts, jumpers and coats. It can even be used in place of denim. The possibilities are endless!

 

Simple Life Canvas by Monaluna

 

All of our canvases are GOTS-certified, which means they conform to strict environment and also social standards. (Read about the standard here!) You can see our new Simple Life canvases here, or for playful and bright, fruit-themed canvases, check out our Juicy Canvas here!

 

Simple Life Blog Tour

This week, Phat QuartersHandmade Boy and a bunch of talented bloggers have teamed up on a blog tour featuring our Simple Life collection! Each day, they’re showing off amazing handmade sewing projects made from our Simple Life organic fabrics that range from apparel, to quilts and even novelty items like a slingshot target.

In a special twist, they’re all focused on boy projects, which is great because I feel that boys can get overlooked when it comes to home sewing. It’s truly inspiring to see all the creative ways these bloggers have used the fabrics. To see the first days’ projects, check out Wild + Wanderful and Phat Quarters, and today’s project over at Handmade Boy.  Follow along to see the darling projects by Sprouting Jube Jube, Paisley Roots and others, and enter to win the GIVEAWAY!

 

Bear Family Shirt

 

Simple Life Slingshot

Herringbone Hoodie

 

 

Organic Fabric Patchwork Heart

 

Do you want to make a special (but simple!) Valentine for your loved ones, and do some scrap busting at the same time? This is the perfect project! Here’s what you’ll need:

 

-Blank greeting card (plus a little extra heavy paper) or heavyweight cardstock or bristol (watercolor paper is great, or something with a little texture)

-scraps of pink and red-toned fabric (or, why not make a green Valentine?)

-sewing machine or hand stitching supplies (especially contrast thread)

-glue or glue stick is helpful

 

Step 1: Prepare your card to the desired size and measure to find the middle of the front of the card. Draw your heart lightly with pencil, and then cut with an Exacto knife (or free-form cut if you’re feeling bold).

 

card middle

 

Step 2: Cut your scraps into long strips and sew together piece-by-piece, with right sides facing. The length of the strips will depend on how many cards you’re doing. If just doing one, you only need the strips to be long enough to cover your heart, plus about 1/2 inch. If you’re planning to do multiple cards keep the strips long and then cut into sections once they’re pieced. Press your piecing flat.

 

piecing

 

Step 3: Arrange your fabrics as you would like them on the inside of the card, with the finished side facing through the heart cutout. Make sure you have at least 1/4″ of fabric all the way around the edges of the heart. If you have glue handy, apply a couple dots to hold the fabric in place.

Step 4: cut an extra piece of paper about 1/4″ larger (on all sides) than your square of pieced fabric. Place this over the raw side of the piecing on the inside of the card, and dot glue at the corners to hold in place.

Step 5: starting at the bottom, stitch around your heart about 1/8″ from the edge of the cutout. Do not backstitch at the beginning and end, and keep the thread tails long. When you have finished stitching, open up the card, and using a pin, pull the thread tails to the inside of the card. Tie in a knot and clip close to the knot.

 

finished heart 2

Valentine

Are you guys familiar with Janine Vangool’s gorgeous Uppercase Magazine? Billed as a magazine “for the creative and curious” each issue takes on an aspect of the creative world, like color, pattern, or calligraphy. Janine is masterful at putting together stunning spreads and interesting, in-depth coverage of such a wide range of subjects. I have loved this magazine for a few years now, and I have saved all the issues, going back to them from time to time to read articles I missed, or just get inspired. I got to meet Janine at Quilt Market last fall, and did a little Q and A with her for her current issue, the Surface Pattern Design Guide. I opened a newsletter from her yesterday, to find that she’d included our interview on her blog. I’m so excited to be included in her publication! Check out the full article here.

Uppercase Magazine - Monaluna

 

Wanderlust by Monaluna

 

Every time I design a new collection, I begin with some sort of central inspiration point. Usually it’s something simple – a mood, or a style, or a particular print idea that gets stuck in my head. With our upcoming Wanderlust collection, the inspiration point was the idea of serendipity.

 

Last winter I had been half-listening to a radio program talking about the value of being open to unexpected good fortune, and it got me thinking. There was a time in my life when I made a serious practice of this: of listening carefully, and paying close attention to everything that came my  way. It’s actually kind of a skill, and one that I worked at regularly. But somewhere over the past several years, amidst the flurry of family building and house buying and business starting, I stopped paying such close attention. I’m very grateful for the life I have, but I’ve gotten much more focused and task-oriented, and a little less attentive to the unexpected but precious little joys that the universe sends my way. So I started to think about the times when I was very attuned to these little serendipities, and I found myself remembering one bittersweet summer when I was able to give myself over to this idea completely.

 

The story began the summer of 1998, when I had agreed to house sit for my dad and step-mom while they traveled in Europe for a month. I was in an odd place in my life at the time: I was trying to get over a bad breakup and not healing gracefully, and I had just quit my first “real” job, and was sketchy on what my next steps should be. A month of contemplation in Pacific Grove, CA seemed like just the right thing. And it was good. I didn’t know anyone there at the time (I had been living in Minneapolis), so I spent 4 weeks thinking, journaling, listening to the universe, walking the dog and making jam from everything I could get at the farm stands outside Watsonville. I thought about what I wanted my life to look like, and who I wanted to be, and I felt a sense of clarity for the first time in a while. The week before I was to leave I happened to see a cute little Cabriolet for sale, and decided on a whim to buy it and drive home to Minneapolis rather than fly. Yes, I was much more spontaneous back then. This was kind of a big deal for me: it was the first car I had bought, and it was my entire life savings (which, to be fair, wasn’t much). I thought I was being very responsible by taking the car to a recommended mechanic and making sure it was in good condition. Which, I was assured, it was.

 

A few days later, I was on the road, off on my one-woman adventure across America. Or half way across, anyway. According to my calculations, I would be home in four days. But that wasn’t to be. I made it as far as Williams, Arizona before the car broke down. Due to the, ahem, foreign nature of my car, there were no parts readily available, so I spent 3 days exploring the area. I rented a car and visited the Grand Canyon, wandered around American Indian ruins, and gazed at the lovely painted desert. It was a minor set-back, but I had time, and I got a really nice mini Arizona vacation out of the deal. A few days and some radiator hoses later, the car was finished and I hopped in and headed East, ready to be home. I made it about 15 minutes out of town before the engine overheated again. Sitting on the side of the road at dusk, hazards blinking, I started to really question whether this car was such a great idea. Eventually, a couple pulled over, and the husband – a former NASA engineer – assured me that I could make it the 1/2 hour drive to Flagstaff – they’d follow me in to make sure I made it okay. The next morning, I took the car to a mechanic, and got the devastating news that I’d fried the engine on my 1/2 hour trek up the mountain. A replacement engine would take an extra 10 days, and and cost almost as much as I’d paid for the car.

 

At this point, present-day ‘me’ would have aborted the mission, trashed the car, bought a plane ticket and flown home in despair. But this is where that serendipity thing came in. I decided to fix the car. That night, I took myself out to an I’ll-be-in-debt-forever-so-might-as-well-start-now dinner at a nice Italian restaurant and poured out my tale of woe to the sympathetic waiter. Who, it turned out, was also a florist. The next morning, I woke up to a gigantic bouquet of flowers waiting for me at the hotel front desk, and the news that some friends of a friend of my mother’s were visiting Minneapolis from (surprise!) Flagstaff, and I was welcome to stay in their (gorgeous) home in the picturesque hills. Thus began my amazing 10 day adventure in Flagstaff and vicinity. What really should have been a very bad turn of events turned out to be an amazing and kind of life-changing experience that enriched me in ways I can’t quite express. The memories and the impressions of that time made a deep and lasting impression on me.

 

So all of that was in my head when I decided to base a collection on that trip. I remembered the photos I took as I drove through the countryside, and thought they would be great inspiration for prints, so I dug around in the attic until I found them. It turns out that what I remember as gorgeous images of the desert landscape were mostly photos of telephone poles and grass:

 

arizona

 

arizona

Ah, pre-digital photography. So I improvised a bit. But I was able to draw from all of those impressions of moody skies, dusky mauve and coral mountains, grazing horses and desert landscapes. And the result is our new collection, Wanderlust!

arizona 3

 

Wanderlust by Monaluna

 

 

 

This spring just FLEW by. There’s always such a flurry building up to Quilt Market, and then we went on a family vacation to the East Coast right after we returned. When we got back I jumped straight into finishing up the new collections for fall, and by the time I caught my breath it was the 4th of July! So this is a belated Quilt Market post, but we had a lot of fun with our booth this time, and we actually got some decent photos. Here’s a little recap of the booth featuring our upcoming organic fabric collections, Wanderlust Poplin and Wanderlust Lawn, and Bloom Poplin and Bloom Double Gauze.

 

WANDERLUST Organic Fabric by Monaluna

 

We had a double booth this time, but actually had 3 collections to show, since we didn’t show Anya at fall market. We decided to build little vignettes for each group, with more props than we usually have. That worked out really well, because we had very little sample fabric to work with (most of the fabrics literally arrived the day before market opened, so I pulled a late night sewing up the little Ella Dress in the Wild Horses fabric that you see here), and also because we were able to give a very clear mood for each group. The Wanderlust collection was inspired by a trip I took (well, actually, I was stranded, so “trip” isn’t quite the right word) in Arizona about 18 years ago, so this set has a very 60’s Southwestern feel. I’m going to share that story on the blog next week, so tune-in if you’re interested.

 

WANDERLUST 2

 

You can see a closer image of the Wildflower skirt here, sewn from the cotton lawn. This pattern is one I made up based loosely on a skirt I bought in Korea 20 years ago. I’ve tried in vain to find another, and finally tried to recreate it. There’s been a lot of interest in the samples, so it may become a pattern soon!

 

Wanderlust Organic Fabric by Monaluna

 

Mindy whipped up a little cross patch pillow and baby quilt top using our strike-offs. I love the way they turned out – the textures and colors work really nicely together.

 

Bloom Organic Fabric by Monaluna

 

The Bloom side of the booth was all French flower-shop feminine, and we found some foxglove and hydrangeas that accented the florals perfectly. The two garments on the mannequins were sewn from the Bloom Double Gauze, and we’re loving the way this new (to us) base cloth works for clothing. So soft and airy!

 

Bloom Organic Fabric by Monaluna

 

The booth was on an aisle, which is always nice because you can leave that wall open to passing traffic. The only downside is it can feel a little TOO open, so we tried to anchor the corner with this little grouping of sewn samples and flowers, connected to the rest of the display with bunting and string lights. It was festive!

 

Bloom Organic Fabric by Monaluna

 

We were able to show Anya off with a gorgeous Diamond Alley quilt by Sassafras Lane and a darling Sally Dress in Hootenanny and Florette. The barkcloth was represented by our own living room chair (covered in Eero) and some pillows from the shop, and we had some darling garments made from the Anya Knits.

 

Monaluna Organic Fabric, Quilt Market 2016

 

All in all, it was a pretty fun booth! Now, I’m just anxiously awaiting the new collections, which were delayed, but which will be arriving in 2 weeks. I’ll keep you posted as they get closer!

 

Anya Organic Fabric by MonalunaOur brand new organic fabric collection, Anya, is coming soon, and we now have the poplin collection available for pre-order! Hop on over to our website to get your order in early. This collection will be available in early November. We will also be carrying many of these prints on a wonderful, wider knit base cloth (58″ wide!), as well as 5 limited edition prints on Bark Cloth! We’ll have those groups on the site soon. 

 

Anya Organic Fabric by Monaluna

 

This collection draws inspiration from mid-century Scandinavian design, and has a stylized woodland theme. Playful owls and hedgehogs are perfect for the younger set, while the florals and geometrics work well for more sophisticated projects and decor.

 

Anya Organic Fabric by Monaluna

Anya Organic Fabric by Monaluna

Check out the full collection on the website here!