Blog Posts Tagged ‘sewing project’

Hi everybody! Wow, this summer has flown by. Wasn’t it just spring?? I got to do a lot of little short trips this summer, along with a couple longer ones, which were so fun, but also made the time seem to speed by even faster. Now the girl is back in school, the tomato plants are starting to brown, and my thoughts are turning to quilts.

 

Months ago, I shared an image of a modified star quilt I made using our (then) new Magical Creatures collection of organic cotton poplins. I got so much great feedback, and a number of people asked for the pattern, or at least for quantities, so that they could make one. But of course, when I’m improv quilting to a deadline, I tend not to keep track of pesky things like the amount of each fabric I’m using, so recreating the pattern was a little trickier that it first seemed. Luckily, Mindy came to my rescue and recreated it for me. Here’s her tutorial. Thanks, Mindy!

 

Magical Creatures Quilt

finished size: 55.5” x 42” (lap/crib size)

Note: We are providing instructions to make the quilt exactly as shown, but feel free to play around with different combinations! You should have enough fabric left over to cut more pieces if needed.

 

Fabric required:

Magical Creatures fat quarter bundle

1 2/3 yd white background fabric

1 3/4 yd backing fabric

1/2 yd binding fabric

Other supplies:

quilt batting, cotton thread, rotary cutter, ruler, and mat

 

Cut the following:

Cut from Unicorn Dreams:

4 4 1/2” squares

1 2” square

Cut from Scales:

4 4 1/2” squares

4 2 1/2” squares

3 6” squares

Cut from Forest Flowers:

5 4 1/2” squares

4 2 1/2” squares

1 6” square

Cut from There Be Dragons:

4 4 1/2” squares

Cut from Mermaid Party:

5 4 1/2” squares

1 2” square

Cut from Dots Pink:

3 4 1/2” squares

2 6” squares

1 2” square

Cut from Dots Lavender:

4 4 1/2” squares

4 2 1/2” squares

4 6” squares

1 2” square

Cut from Checkmark:

4 4 1/2” squares

4 2 1/2” squares

4 6” squares

1 2” square

Cut from Shards:

3 4 1/2” squares

8 2 1/2” squares

4 6” squares

1 2” square

Cut from the white background fabric:

5-2” WOF (width of fabric) strips for borders

6-2” WOF (width of fabric) strips for sashing, subcut into 17-2” x 12 1/2” strips

18-6” squares

24-4.5” squares

24-2.5” squares

 

Sewing instructions:

This quilt has two types of blocks: a nine patch and a star block.

Nine Patch

Each nine patch uses nine 4 1/2” squares – 5 with prints and 4 white.

Lay out the squares in three rows, alternating prints and background, and starting with a print.

Using a 1/4” seam, sew the squares into three rows of three, and press the seams toward the printed fabric. Join the rows, nesting the seams for nicely matched seams. Press the row seams to either side or open.

Make six of these blocks.

We used these print combinations:

Dots Lavender, There Be Dragons, Scales, Mermaid Party, Forest Flowers

Unicorn Dreams, Scales, Shards, Dots Pink, Dots Lavender

Checkmark, Forest Flowers, Dots Pink, There Be Dragons, Unicorn Dreams

Dots Lavender, Mermaid Party, Scales, Checkmark, Dots Pink

Scales, Forest Flowers, Checkmark, Mermaid Party, Shards

Forest Flowers, Checkmark, There Be Dragons, Dots Lavender, Shards

 

Star Blocks

First make half square triangles using the 8-at-a-time method. Lay out a printed 6” square, right side up. Place a white 6” square on top and mark the 6” white squares with diagonal lines going from corner to corner, crossing each other in an X.

Stitch 1/4” on each side of the drawn lines.

Cut the squares in half lengthwise and crosswise, and cut on the marked diagonal lines. Press the seams open to avoid bulky seam intersections. Trim the half square triangles down to 2 1/2” squares.

Now you can start assembling the star blocks. Lay out the blocks as shown:

Sew the blocks into pairs, press seams open, sew the pairs together into 2×2 blocks (4-patches), and press seams open. Trim 4 patches to 4 1/2” if needed.

 

Lay out the squares into a nine patch as shown. Sew into rows of three, press seams open, sew the rows together, and press the seams open. 

We used the following print combinations (listed as center square, star points, triangles, corner arrows):

Unicorn Dreams, Dots Lavender, Checkmark, Shards (shown in photo)

Mermaid Party, Scales, Dots Lavender, Checkmark

There Be Dragons, Checkmark, Shards, Scales

Mermaid Party, Checkmark, Scales, Shards

Unicorn Dreams, Dots Pink, Dots Lavender, Forest Flowers

Forest Flowers, Dots Pink, Shards, Dots Lavender

Lay out the quilt into rows, starting with a star block, and alternating with nine patches. Lay out the 2”x12 1/2” sashing strips and 2” square cornerstones between the blocks. Sew the blocks and sashing strips into rows, and sew the sashing strips and cornerstones into rows. Press seams. Sew the rows together, and press seams.

Cut 2-2” WOF strips to the width of the quilt for the borders. Sew the borders to the edges of the short ends of the quilt and press the seams. Piece together 2-2” WOF strips to the length of the quilt (with the short borders sewn on). Sew the final two borders to the long edges of the quilt. 

The quilt top is now finished! Quilt and bind as desired, and enjoy!!

Simple Water Bottle Sling

Summer officially hit hard here a couple of weeks ago, and I needed a little refresher on heat-management. We don’t have air-conditioning in our house, so once it gets hot, we get into a routine of opening all the windows in the evening when it cools down (which it usually does here in the Bay Area), and then closing them all and drawing the curtains once it gets warmer outside than in, around 9 am. I also had to change my lunchtime hike habit to one where I got my outside exercise earlier or later, when the sun wasn’t as hot. And I needed to bring water. Which has always been a challenge for me because I hate carrying things when I hike, and didn’t really need a backpack for my 90 minute excursions. So, as I was heading out on one particularly hot day, I took a pause to sew this little water bottle sling. It took me about 1 1/2 hours, but I was figuring it out as I went, and I used some of our new Terrarium organic fabric (from the Saturday Collection) paired with organic hemp muslin that we have in the shop. It worked perfectly! I think it would be even better with an added pocket, which you could easily add. Here’s the simple tutorial. 

SIMPLE WATER BOTTLE SLING TUTORIAL


Fabric and Notions

-1/3 yard sturdy fabric for bottom, base and strap (I used the hemp muslin for this, but you could also interface quilting cottons, or use a canvas, denim or similar heavier fabric.

-1 10×13″ piece of printed fabric for top (poplin, quilting cotton or canvas works great)

-1 small scrap of interfacing or stabilizer (can be an extra scrap of fabric)

-1 long ribbon, cord or scrap of fabric to make the tie, 24″+

-Eyelets or grommets (or you can just sew two buttonholes)

Cut Pieces

Bottom: Cut 1 4″ circle (I used a wide-mouth mason jar as a template, giving 1/2 of space around the edge)

Base: Cut 1 5×13″ rectangle

Top: Cut 1 10×13″ rectangle

Strap: Cut 1 5×34″ rectangle (Note: this size worked for me as a comfortable cross-body length. However, because the strap won’t be adjustable, use a measuring tape or measure a string to 34″ and make sure this size works for you. If not, adjust accordingly.

Procedure

  1. Sew the strap: with right sides facing, sew the long edge of the strap with a 1/2″ seam allowance to form a long tube. Turn and press. If you’re not familiar with tube-turning, a chopstick or other turning tool can help with this. I have one that looks like this.
  2. Join base to top: with right sides facing, sew your base fabric to your top fabric along the 13″-inch edge. Open and press the seam down toward the base. Then, on the right side of the fabric, topstitch 1/8″ from the seam on the base side, securing the seam allowance in the stitching. This will strengthen the seam and keep the seam allowance pinned in place.
  3. Create fold lines for later step: at the top edge, fold the edge 1/4″ to wrong side and press, and then 1 additional inch and press, creating a channel. Do not sew yet (this will make it easier when you get to that step).
  4. Create the tube: with right sides facing, sew the side edges with a 1/2″ seam allowance to form a tube. Press seam open.
  5. Sew the tube to the bottom circle (including one end of the strap in the seam): with wrong sides of the side tube out, slip one end of the strap inside the tube and center it over the side seam at the lower edge, matching raw edges. Then, sandwich the strap between the lower edge of the side tube and an edge of the bottom circle and pin in place. Continue matching the lower edge of the side tube to the edge of the circular base with right sides facing and pin all the way around. Stitch with a 1/2″ seam allowance.
  6. Insert grommets, eyelets or buttonholes: using water-soluble ink or chalk, mark the center front by flattening tube and marking opposite center back. Apply fusible interfacing or stabilizer the the center front, just under the second fold line. This is where you will insert 2 parallel grommets or eyelets, or sew 2 small parallel buttonholes, to accommodate the tie. I used a grommet kit that I had on hand (probably purchased from Joann’s). The first time I tried, the grommets pulled out because I was using lighter fabric and hadn’t used stabilizer, so don’t skip this step if using grommets on lighter fabric.)
  7. Sew the channel (including top edge of strap): Once your grommets are inserted just below the second fold line, with wrong side of the sling out, fold the top to the wrong side along the 1/4″ line, then again along the second fold to form the channel. Pin in place. Being careful not to twist strap, pull the loose edge up and slip it underneath the lower edge of the channel, centered over the side seam of the tube, and pin in place. Stitch close to the lower edge of the channel, making sure to catch the strap in the seam. Turn the sling right side out and topstitch the upper edge of the channel over the strap to hold in place.
  8. Make the tie (optional): if you are not using pre-made ribbon or cord, cut a long, 1″ wide strip of fabric that coordinates with your print. Mine was about 36″, but it should be at least 24″. Fold each long edge 1/4″ to wrong side, so that edges meet at the center. Press. Fold the strip in half the long way so that the edges are encased and the strip is now about 1/4″ wide. Stitch close to the open edge. This will be your tie.
  9. Using a small safety pin, thread the ribbon/cord/tie through one grommet, around the channel and out the other grommet. Tie knots at each end of the tie.
  10. Fill up your water bottle, sling it on your back and get out there!

Happy (almost) Valentines Day! I’ve been itching to work on some fun Valentines projects the last couple of weeks, but my weekends have been taken up with a more daunting project: we’re building a chicken coop! Of course, I thought that project would take only the last Saturday in January, but instead it’s dragged on and taken up the better part of the last few weekends. Still, it’s been fun, and it’s going to be an awesome chicken palace for our girls. (Photos coming soon… :)) So instead, I’m going to mine the blog and revive some oldie but goodie project ideas for you.

 

Last year, I came across a tutorial for this little bag on Gingercake, and stitched it up using a variety of pink organic fabric scraps from our Bloom and Haiku collections. It’s quick and easy, and makes a super cute Valentines gift for little girls. You can get our Valentines 2018 bundle with these fabrics and more on our website here.

Patchwork Heart Bag

 

Several years ago, I got crafty with the Valentines and made these little fabric cards. They are really fun to make, and can be as simple or as intricate as you like (or, in my case, have time for). Anabelle was just little when she got this one, and I still find it on her bookcase or in with her dolls, and it’s nice to have an enduring sentiment. My husband like his, too. You can see the tutorial on the blog here.

 

 

 

When I was a kid, my mom would always make these amazing Petit Cherry Cheese Tarts for Valentines Day. They were one of the highlights of my childhood. Apparently, my grandmother was the one who made them originally, and the recipe calls for tart Michigan cherries, which were easy to come by in Michigan, where she lived. I’ve found them to be more elusive in the Bay Area, so this year I tried to make them with Oregon Dark Sweet Cherries. They’re still delicious, but the color came out more purple, and lacked the bright flavor of the tart cherries. I’m going to continue my search for a source, but I realized I could get the right cherries on Amazon, so now I know where to go if I can’t find them locally next year. The full recipe is on the blog here. 

 

holiday stockings tutorial

 

The holidays have arrived again! My mom just flew in from Minneapolis on Monday, and will be here through Christmas, so I’m doing a little check-list of holiday supplies. Last year was the first Christmas that we spent in our own home, and I realized too late that we didn’t have our own Christmas stockings. The arrival of Meadow last week has given me a perfect opportunity to stitch up some richly-hued stockings to hang… over the floor heater, I guess. Here’s a little tutorial for making simple, unique holiday stockings.

What you will need:

-large paper for pattern

-fabric and 1-3 contrast fabrics

-1/4″ cotton batting

-trim (ricrac, etc), if desired

-ribbon or trim for hanging

-sewing machine, thread, pins etc.

 

Step 1: Create pattern and cut out pieces

I started out by making a stocking-shaped sketch on a large piece of paper. Trace the shape with a sharpie and cut out. This will serve as the pattern for the lining and batting, and the template for the outside layer of the stocking (heretofore referred to as “the stocking”). Mine was roughly 12″x20″ at the largest points, but you can vary the size depending on the end result you want.

 

stocking template

 

Then, if you would like to incorporate other fabrics, you can customize it by choosing ways to piece the stocking. I did two versions, one with accent toe and heel, and the other with a pieced stocking:

 

stocking template 2

 

Cut out the individual shapes (making sure to keep the original stocking shape in one piece) and use these as pattern pieces to cut out the fabrics, adding 1/2″ seam allowance all around each pattern piece. Lay each piece on double-layer fabric (with wrong sides facing)  so that you have uniform pieces for the front and back of the stocking. Use the original uncut shape to cut out the lining (cut 2) and the batting (cut 2). (Note: keep in mind that the lining will be folded down to create the “cuff” at the top of the stocking, so if you’re using a directional print for the lining, you should place the pattern pieces on the print so that they appear upside-down. This way, when the cuff is folded down, the print will be right-side-up.)

 

Meadow stocking pattern

meadow stocking pattern pieces

meadow stocking pattern pieces 2

 

Step 2: pin and stitch

 

Sew your pieces together with a 1/2 inch seam. Then trim the seams to 1/4″ and press open. If you are doing a curved heel seam and are a beginning sewist, I will warn you that it can be a bit trickier than a straight seam, but if you clip both curved edges with a 1/4″ clip every inch, the edges should meet up. Just press this seam away from the heel.

 

clipping seam

clipped and pinned seam

meadow stocking seams

 

Pin the outer stocking to the batting:

 

meadow stocking and batting

 

Then place the corresponding lining piece on top of the stocking with right sides facing. If you’re planning to use a trim at the top edge of the stocking (which will then be folded down to form the bottom edge of the cuff), insert it between the two layers and pin in place. Stitch with a 1/2″ seam and open out.

 

ricrac trim

ball trim

meadow stockings 5

 

 

Repeat for the back side of the stocking, and then place the back & back lining on top of the front & front lining, as pictured:

 

stocking layers stacked

 

Cut a 6″ piece of ribbon or trim, form into a loop and insert about 2 1/2″ from the top seam on the back side of the stocking lining, with the raw edges of the ribbon matching the raw edges of the lining.

 

stocking loop

 

Pin in place. Pin stockings together at any seams you would like to match up, plus a few other spots.

 

Choose a place on the stocking lining (I chose the bottom of the foot) and stitch with a 1/2″ seam allowance all the way around the stocking, leaving a 3″ opening in the lining. This will allow you to pull the stocking “right side out”.  Once you’ve stitched the stockings together, trim or pink the edges to about 1/4″.

 

turning opening

 

Then, reach into the lining and grab the toe of the outer stocking, pulling it through the hole until the whole stocking is right-side-out. press stocking and all seams.

 

stocking right-side-out

 

Then, stitch up the turning hole…

 

stitching

 

stuff the lining inside the stocking, turn down the cuff and you’re done!

 

meadow holiday stockings tutorial

 

Happy Thursday, everyone! Today, the talented Karen LePage of One Girl Circus will be guest-blogging and sharing a tutorial for how to convert our On the Go dress pattern to a super cute peplum top. Karen is a pattern maker, author (Sewing For Boys) and seamstress extraordinaire , and has worked on all of our Monaluna patterns. Take it away, Karen!

 

The On the Go Dress is equally as charming when made up as a peplum blouse, and the process to convert the pattern is remarkably easy. Follow our tutorial to alter your pattern and you’ll have a blouse you can wear with anything you like when the weather turns too cool for a summer dress.

 

Note: When you make clothes from Monaluna patterns, you should first trace the pieces required in your size onto some sort of pattern paper. You can use anything from dedicated tracing medium found at the fabric store, to a roll of drawing paper from your kids’ art supply stash. The only requirement is that the paper must be transparent enough to see the lines you want to trace.  Here’s a good tutorial on tracing patterns, if you need a little help.

 

 

Get Ready

 

 

Gather your traced copies of the three pieces that require adjustment: front skirt, back skirt, and button placket.  You will use all the remaining pattern pieces as is, omitting the pockets.

Alter the Pattern

 

 

To make the blouse pictured here, use a ruler to measure down 6″ from the waist edge of your chosen size every few inches. Using a curved ruler (or a steady hand), connect the dots to form the peplum hem. Repeat for the back skirt. Use these new pieces to cut the peplum portion of your new blouse.

how to alter the skirt pattern tutorial diagrams

Now you’ll need to shorten the placket to accommodate the new shorter length of the “skirt” portion of the pattern. For the 6″ peplum pictured, the placket measurements are as follows:

XS: 22 1/2″ || S: 22 3/4″  ||  M: 23 1/4″  ||  L: 24 1/4″  ||  XL: 24 3/4″

 

Sew it Up

 

 

Construct according to the On the Go Dress instruction sheet, skipping the pocket.  Pair with a cardigan or cropped jacket in cool weather.

 

Wear it!

 

 

Wear your new peplum blouse with everything from skinny jeans to trousers, from pencil mini to flowing maxi skirt to take you into cooler weather.

 

Hi Everyone! Our scheduled post got delayed yesterday due to some technical difficulties with the website, so with no further ado, please welcome guest blogger Heidi Staples!

 

My name is Heidi Staples, and I blog at Fabric Mutt (fabricmutt.blogspot.com). I