Blog Posts Tagged ‘sewing tutorial’

Simple Water Bottle Sling

Summer officially hit hard here a couple of weeks ago, and I needed a little refresher on heat-management. We don’t have air-conditioning in our house, so once it gets hot, we get into a routine of opening all the windows in the evening when it cools down (which it usually does here in the Bay Area), and then closing them all and drawing the curtains once it gets warmer outside than in, around 9 am. I also had to change my lunchtime hike habit to one where I got my outside exercise earlier or later, when the sun wasn’t as hot. And I needed to bring water. Which has always been a challenge for me because I hate carrying things when I hike, and didn’t really need a backpack for my 90 minute excursions. So, as I was heading out on one particularly hot day, I took a pause to sew this little water bottle sling. It took me about 1 1/2 hours, but I was figuring it out as I went, and I used some of our new Terrarium organic fabric (from the Saturday Collection) paired with organic hemp muslin that we have in the shop. It worked perfectly! I think it would be even better with an added pocket, which you could easily add. Here’s the simple tutorial. 

SIMPLE WATER BOTTLE SLING TUTORIAL


Fabric and Notions

-1/3 yard sturdy fabric for bottom, base and strap (I used the hemp muslin for this, but you could also interface quilting cottons, or use a canvas, denim or similar heavier fabric.

-1 10×13″ piece of printed fabric for top (poplin, quilting cotton or canvas works great)

-1 small scrap of interfacing or stabilizer (can be an extra scrap of fabric)

-1 long ribbon, cord or scrap of fabric to make the tie, 24″+

-Eyelets or grommets (or you can just sew two buttonholes)

Cut Pieces

Bottom: Cut 1 4″ circle (I used a wide-mouth mason jar as a template, giving 1/2 of space around the edge)

Base: Cut 1 5×13″ rectangle

Top: Cut 1 10×13″ rectangle

Strap: Cut 1 5×34″ rectangle (Note: this size worked for me as a comfortable cross-body length. However, because the strap won’t be adjustable, use a measuring tape or measure a string to 34″ and make sure this size works for you. If not, adjust accordingly.

Procedure

  1. Sew the strap: with right sides facing, sew the long edge of the strap with a 1/2″ seam allowance to form a long tube. Turn and press. If you’re not familiar with tube-turning, a chopstick or other turning tool can help with this. I have one that looks like this.
  2. Join base to top: with right sides facing, sew your base fabric to your top fabric along the 13″-inch edge. Open and press the seam down toward the base. Then, on the right side of the fabric, topstitch 1/8″ from the seam on the base side, securing the seam allowance in the stitching. This will strengthen the seam and keep the seam allowance pinned in place.
  3. Create fold lines for later step: at the top edge, fold the edge 1/4″ to wrong side and press, and then 1 additional inch and press, creating a channel. Do not sew yet (this will make it easier when you get to that step).
  4. Create the tube: with right sides facing, sew the side edges with a 1/2″ seam allowance to form a tube. Press seam open.
  5. Sew the tube to the bottom circle (including one end of the strap in the seam): with wrong sides of the side tube out, slip one end of the strap inside the tube and center it over the side seam at the lower edge, matching raw edges. Then, sandwich the strap between the lower edge of the side tube and an edge of the bottom circle and pin in place. Continue matching the lower edge of the side tube to the edge of the circular base with right sides facing and pin all the way around. Stitch with a 1/2″ seam allowance.
  6. Insert grommets, eyelets or buttonholes: using water-soluble ink or chalk, mark the center front by flattening tube and marking opposite center back. Apply fusible interfacing or stabilizer the the center front, just under the second fold line. This is where you will insert 2 parallel grommets or eyelets, or sew 2 small parallel buttonholes, to accommodate the tie. I used a grommet kit that I had on hand (probably purchased from Joann’s). The first time I tried, the grommets pulled out because I was using lighter fabric and hadn’t used stabilizer, so don’t skip this step if using grommets on lighter fabric.)
  7. Sew the channel (including top edge of strap): Once your grommets are inserted just below the second fold line, with wrong side of the sling out, fold the top to the wrong side along the 1/4″ line, then again along the second fold to form the channel. Pin in place. Being careful not to twist strap, pull the loose edge up and slip it underneath the lower edge of the channel, centered over the side seam of the tube, and pin in place. Stitch close to the lower edge of the channel, making sure to catch the strap in the seam. Turn the sling right side out and topstitch the upper edge of the channel over the strap to hold in place.
  8. Make the tie (optional): if you are not using pre-made ribbon or cord, cut a long, 1″ wide strip of fabric that coordinates with your print. Mine was about 36″, but it should be at least 24″. Fold each long edge 1/4″ to wrong side, so that edges meet at the center. Press. Fold the strip in half the long way so that the edges are encased and the strip is now about 1/4″ wide. Stitch close to the open edge. This will be your tie.
  9. Using a small safety pin, thread the ribbon/cord/tie through one grommet, around the channel and out the other grommet. Tie knots at each end of the tie.
  10. Fill up your water bottle, sling it on your back and get out there!

Threadfollower Kangaroo Kit

We recently got in 6 new Threadfollower kits, each featuring it’s own animal design. Today we are going to help you through this precious Kangaroo kit. It is simple, fun and can be completed in an afternoon.

The kit included: beige felt (2 small, 2 large squares), beige embroidery thread, embroidery needle, stuffing, directions, and pattern

You will need: scissors and pins

To start, the directions will help you prepare your thread. This is done very simply by splitting the thread into two 3-ply pieces. Next, pin the pattern to the appropriately sized felt pieces and cut along the edges.

After cutting all your pieces (2 big body, 2 little body, 2 big ears, 2 little ears, 1 tail, 1 pouch, & 1 base), thread your needle and begin by sewing the two large body pieces together, using a whip stitch.

Once you’ve made it almost to the end, place the tail in-between the two body pieces and continue sewing. Refer back to the pattern for placement guidance.

Once the tail is attached, finish stitching the body. After knotting the thread begin stuffing the kangaroo. I cut a smaller piece to push into the head and stuffed the remaining. Don’t forget to leave some out for the baby’s stuffing.

 

Once stuffed, attach the base using a whip stitch. Attach the pouch to the front of the belly, leaving the top open.  Make sure to allow room for the baby to fit in the pouch. I found it easiest to position the pouch by pinning down the sides.

 

Next, add the ears by pinching the pieces together and sewing one on either side. The little baby body is a quick sew. Whip stitch all the way around leaving a small hole to stuff. Once stuffed close off the opening and attach the little ears.

 

 

Lastly, sew the baby’s nose using the brown thread and the mother’s eyes using the black thread. TA-DAH! The sweetest little kangaroo pair. Perfect for any pocket, lunch box, backpack, or windowsill.

 

 

 

 

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holiday stockings tutorial

 

The holidays have arrived again! My mom just flew in from Minneapolis on Monday, and will be here through Christmas, so I’m doing a little check-list of holiday supplies. Last year was the first Christmas that we spent in our own home, and I realized too late that we didn’t have our own Christmas stockings. The arrival of Meadow last week has given me a perfect opportunity to stitch up some richly-hued stockings to hang… over the floor heater, I guess. Here’s a little tutorial for making simple, unique holiday stockings.

What you will need:

-large paper for pattern

-fabric and 1-3 contrast fabrics

-1/4″ cotton batting

-trim (ricrac, etc), if desired

-ribbon or trim for hanging

-sewing machine, thread, pins etc.

 

Step 1: Create pattern and cut out pieces

I started out by making a stocking-shaped sketch on a large piece of paper. Trace the shape with a sharpie and cut out. This will serve as the pattern for the lining and batting, and the template for the outside layer of the stocking (heretofore referred to as “the stocking”). Mine was roughly 12″x20″ at the largest points, but you can vary the size depending on the end result you want.

 

stocking template

 

Then, if you would like to incorporate other fabrics, you can customize it by choosing ways to piece the stocking. I did two versions, one with accent toe and heel, and the other with a pieced stocking:

 

stocking template 2

 

Cut out the individual shapes (making sure to keep the original stocking shape in one piece) and use these as pattern pieces to cut out the fabrics, adding 1/2″ seam allowance all around each pattern piece. Lay each piece on double-layer fabric (with wrong sides facing)  so that you have uniform pieces for the front and back of the stocking. Use the original uncut shape to cut out the lining (cut 2) and the batting (cut 2). (Note: keep in mind that the lining will be folded down to create the “cuff” at the top of the stocking, so if you’re using a directional print for the lining, you should place the pattern pieces on the print so that they appear upside-down. This way, when the cuff is folded down, the print will be right-side-up.)

 

Meadow stocking pattern

meadow stocking pattern pieces

meadow stocking pattern pieces 2

 

Step 2: pin and stitch

 

Sew your pieces together with a 1/2 inch seam. Then trim the seams to 1/4″ and press open. If you are doing a curved heel seam and are a beginning sewist, I will warn you that it can be a bit trickier than a straight seam, but if you clip both curved edges with a 1/4″ clip every inch, the edges should meet up. Just press this seam away from the heel.

 

clipping seam

clipped and pinned seam

meadow stocking seams

 

Pin the outer stocking to the batting:

 

meadow stocking and batting

 

Then place the corresponding lining piece on top of the stocking with right sides facing. If you’re planning to use a trim at the top edge of the stocking (which will then be folded down to form the bottom edge of the cuff), insert it between the two layers and pin in place. Stitch with a 1/2″ seam and open out.

 

ricrac trim

ball trim

meadow stockings 5

 

 

Repeat for the back side of the stocking, and then place the back & back lining on top of the front & front lining, as pictured:

 

stocking layers stacked

 

Cut a 6″ piece of ribbon or trim, form into a loop and insert about 2 1/2″ from the top seam on the back side of the stocking lining, with the raw edges of the ribbon matching the raw edges of the lining.

 

stocking loop

 

Pin in place. Pin stockings together at any seams you would like to match up, plus a few other spots.

 

Choose a place on the stocking lining (I chose the bottom of the foot) and stitch with a 1/2″ seam allowance all the way around the stocking, leaving a 3″ opening in the lining. This will allow you to pull the stocking “right side out”.  Once you’ve stitched the stockings together, trim or pink the edges to about 1/4″.

 

turning opening

 

Then, reach into the lining and grab the toe of the outer stocking, pulling it through the hole until the whole stocking is right-side-out. press stocking and all seams.

 

stocking right-side-out

 

Then, stitch up the turning hole…

 

stitching

 

stuff the lining inside the stocking, turn down the cuff and you’re done!

 

meadow holiday stockings tutorial

 

Happy Friday, everyone! It’s a gorgeous spring morning here, and I’m putting the finishing touches on a new collection for fall (peeks coming soon!). While I paint, Heidi from Fabric Mutt is back to share a tutorial for her Scooter Bag, using the Havana collection. Hello, Heidi!

 

The Scooter Bag

This soft, floppy bag is the perfect size for the reading mat along with some books, toys, or any other items you want to pack for the trip. The velcro closure is easy for little hands to open and close, and the long padded strap allows for comfortable crossbody wear.

Materials
(2) 22 x 13