Blog Posts Tagged ‘Tutorial’

Threadfollower Kangaroo Kit

We recently got in 6 new Threadfollower kits, each featuring it’s own animal design. Today we are going to help you through this precious Kangaroo kit. It is simple, fun and can be completed in an afternoon.

The kit included: beige felt (2 small, 2 large squares), beige embroidery thread, embroidery needle, stuffing, directions, and pattern

You will need: scissors and pins

To start, the directions will help you prepare your thread. This is done very simply by splitting the thread into two 3-ply pieces. Next, pin the pattern to the appropriately sized felt pieces and cut along the edges.

After cutting all your pieces (2 big body, 2 little body, 2 big ears, 2 little ears, 1 tail, 1 pouch, & 1 base), thread your needle and begin by sewing the two large body pieces together, using a whip stitch.

Once you’ve made it almost to the end, place the tail in-between the two body pieces and continue sewing. Refer back to the pattern for placement guidance.

Once the tail is attached, finish stitching the body. After knotting the thread begin stuffing the kangaroo. I cut a smaller piece to push into the head and stuffed the remaining. Don’t forget to leave some out for the baby’s stuffing.

 

Once stuffed, attach the base using a whip stitch. Attach the pouch to the front of the belly, leaving the top open.  Make sure to allow room for the baby to fit in the pouch. I found it easiest to position the pouch by pinning down the sides.

 

Next, add the ears by pinching the pieces together and sewing one on either side. The little baby body is a quick sew. Whip stitch all the way around leaving a small hole to stuff. Once stuffed close off the opening and attach the little ears.

 

 

Lastly, sew the baby’s nose using the brown thread and the mother’s eyes using the black thread. TA-DAH! The sweetest little kangaroo pair. Perfect for any pocket, lunch box, backpack, or windowsill.

 

 

 

 

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August is coming to a close and, at least in our area, all the kids are back in school. Are summers shorter than they used to be, or does time just fly that much faster when you’re an adult? I still have stacks of summer sewing projects that I wanted to do, but it’s time to move on to fall. We’ve stitched up some darling drawstring backpacks, perfect for light loads for school, sleepover kits or a hands-free carryall for grown-ups.

Sew Can She  is always coming up with great patterns and tutorials, and we spotted this one, available for free for download. It’s also easy to modify to suit your needs. We decided to make ours a bit bigger and use grommets instead of fabric tabs for the securing of the straps. The pattern includes fabric straps, but you can just as easily use rope-like cording, like we did, ribbon, or any other strap-link material.

There is also an option to add a ruffle accent at the top to add a bit of flare. The ruffle is added by cutting the fabric at 6″ instead of 3″ at the top. Then sewing a stitch an inch away from the seam allowing the trim to attach to the main fabric.

Adding grommets are much easier than you may think. You can purchase a grommet kit at most craft stores or online. They come with easy to follow instructions and the only additional tool you will need is a hammer. We really enjoyed how the grommets and cord finished these backpacks. They are also super adjustable for all sizes and fits.

This backpacks were made using Cottage Garden Organic Poplin and Simple Life Organic Poplin, but you could easily use canvas for a studier finish. Overall, these backpacks only need about an yard and a quarter of fabric and take no time at all to sew up. Don’t forget to tag @monalunadesign and hashtag #monaluna on Instagram so we can see how you put yours together. Happy Sewing!

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Welcome to Part 2 of our Anya Knit Tutorial series: The Infinity Scarf! We’ve been sewing up cozy infinity scarves for the shop using our new Anya organic cotton knits, and they’ve been really popular. They’re the perfect weight to add a bit of warmth and a stylish print to any outfit. Here’s Mindy with the simple instructions!

Hi All!

Infinity scarves are a fun and easy project, and make a great gift or addition to your wardrobe. We love these scarves in our Anya Organic Knits as a spring accessory! You can play around with the dimensions to make your scarf wider or narrower, shorter or longer. Our Anya Knits are 58” wide, so you’ll have enough fabric to make two scarves!

 

You will need:

  • 1 ½ yds of knit fabric A

  • 1 ½ yds of knit fabric B

  • sewing machine/serger and coordinating thread

  • hand sewing needle

  • pins

  • scissors/rotary cutter

 

Step by step guide:

-Cut a rectangle measuring 14” x 54” (with the long side on the length grain) out of both fabric A and fabric B*.

Anya Organic Infinity Scarf

-Place right sides together and sew along the long edges with a ½” seam allowance, using a zig zag stitch or serger.

 

-Holding the scarf upright and vertical with wrong side out, reach inside the tube and pull the lower short edge up through the tube so that the right sides are facing and the raw edges are even. Pin right sides together, matching fabric A to fabric A and fabric B to fabric B.

Anya Organic Infinity Scarf

-Sew around the tube with a ½” seam allowance, leaving about a 4” gap.

Anya Organic Infinity Scarf

-Turn the scarf right side out through the 4″ gap. Press, and hand stitch the opening closed.

anya organic knit infinity scarf

Let us know if you make an infinity scarf and how it turned out!

–Mindy

*Note: If you prefer to use only one fabric you can cut one larger rectangle, measuring 27” x 54”, then fold lengthwise right sides together and sew the long edge.

Happy Friday, everyone! In honor of today’s 100-degree forecast, here’s Karen LePage from One Girl Circus with part 2 of the Little Bee tutorial: how to turn the yoga pants into shorts. Enjoy!

Monaluna Little Bee Summer Tutorial - Sewing with Knits - Little Bee for Summer

Here’s part 2 to our tutorial to complete your Little Bee summer outfit. Today we’ll alter the Yoga Pants into little shorts to show off those baby legs. Photos in the tutorial use Monaluna’s upcoming Meadow Knits.

 

Tutorial: transform the pants into shorts.

Determine the desired length of your shorts by measuring the inseam of a pair you already have.

Monaluna Little Bee Summer Tutorial - Sewing with Knits - Meadow Knits - Little Bee for Summer

Use a dark marking to highlight the leg seams on your traced pattern.
Monaluna Little Bee Summer Tutorial - Sewing with Knits - Trace dark lines to highlight leg seams
Mark the shorts length on your sewing pattern.

 Monaluna Little Bee Summer Tutorial - Sewing with Knits - mark new hem length

Fold along this line. Here you can see how the darkened tracing will help you with the following steps.

Monaluna Little Bee Summer Tutorial - Sewing with Knits - fold along new hem

For the hem allowance, measure 3/4″ from the folded edge and draw a line to mark.

 Monaluna Little Bee Summer Tutorial - Sewing with Knits - Mark the Hem Allowance

Because the Little Bee Yoga Pants are flared and not straight, you will need to trace along the leg lines that you see through the folded page to mark the hem shape.

Monaluna Little Bee Summer Tutorial - Sewing with Knits - mark new hem

Open out the fold and cut along the hem edge you just marked.

Monaluna Little Bee Summer Tutorial - Sewing with Knits - new hem

Tip: you can use the grainline marking to align the print as you’re cutting out your new shorts.

Monaluna Little Bee Summer Tutorial - Sewing with Knits - align your print

Now you can proceed with the directions in your pattern to complete a new adorable pair of shorts.

Happy Thursday, everyone! Today, the talented Karen LePage of One Girl Circus will be guest-blogging and sharing a tutorial for how to convert our On the Go dress pattern to a super cute peplum top. Karen is a pattern maker, author (Sewing For Boys) and seamstress extraordinaire , and has worked on all of our Monaluna patterns. Take it away, Karen!

 

The On the Go Dress is equally as charming when made up as a peplum blouse, and the process to convert the pattern is remarkably easy. Follow our tutorial to alter your pattern and you’ll have a blouse you can wear with anything you like when the weather turns too cool for a summer dress.

 

Note: When you make clothes from Monaluna patterns, you should first trace the pieces required in your size onto some sort of pattern paper. You can use anything from dedicated tracing medium found at the fabric store, to a roll of drawing paper from your kids’ art supply stash. The only requirement is that the paper must be transparent enough to see the lines you want to trace.  Here’s a good tutorial on tracing patterns, if you need a little help.

 

 

Get Ready

 

 

Gather your traced copies of the three pieces that require adjustment: front skirt, back skirt, and button placket.  You will use all the remaining pattern pieces as is, omitting the pockets.

Alter the Pattern

 

 

To make the blouse pictured here, use a ruler to measure down 6″ from the waist edge of your chosen size every few inches. Using a curved ruler (or a steady hand), connect the dots to form the peplum hem. Repeat for the back skirt. Use these new pieces to cut the peplum portion of your new blouse.

how to alter the skirt pattern tutorial diagrams

Now you’ll need to shorten the placket to accommodate the new shorter length of the “skirt” portion of the pattern. For the 6″ peplum pictured, the placket measurements are as follows:

XS: 22 1/2″ || S: 22 3/4″  ||  M: 23 1/4″  ||  L: 24 1/4″  ||  XL: 24 3/4″

 

Sew it Up

 

 

Construct according to the On the Go Dress instruction sheet, skipping the pocket.  Pair with a cardigan or cropped jacket in cool weather.

 

Wear it!

 

 

Wear your new peplum blouse with everything from skinny jeans to trousers, from pencil mini to flowing maxi skirt to take you into cooler weather.